Big hole

Fall Big Hole is this weekend! Last chance to get signed up!

2018 GLENKERRY CUP FALL BIG HOLE

Saturday, October 20, 2018

9 AM Check-In & Warm up  |  10 AM Shotgun

$55 Entry   |  $30 for Members

The event is a 4 person scramble and includes six prize holes, chili bar, and skins $20 per team (optional). Please fill out the request form below or sign up in the pro shop.

Questions? Register? Call 616-225-4653 or register online!

Become a Member and Save Money! Play the rest of the season… FREE!

As the 2018 season winds down, we are celebrating another great year at Glenkerry!  We want to invited you to join as a member now for the 2019 season with these great incentives! We love Glenkerry Golf Course and you will too!

Monthly & Annual Membership Payment Options Available!

PLAY GOLF NOW!

Join for the 2019 Season and play the rest of this season FREE!

TRY IT OUT!

Not sure about a year-long Membership? Try it out! Play the the rest of the 2018 season for just $149. If you like it, we’ll put that $149 toward your annual membership fees!

Tuesday’s game is Pinehurst! Join us for a great time tomorrow!

This week’s event is… Pinehurst

Two Man Teams
Each player hits a drive, the best drive is chosen, and players alternate shots from there. (Unlike the Chapman, both players do not hit second shots from their partners drives.)

Tuesday, October 9  |  Begins 4:30 PM

Costs

  • $10 entry fee per two person team – $4 goes to skins and $6 goes to prize holes!
  • Regular League Players Green Fee: $12
  • Non-Regular League Players Green Fee: $15

Call the Shop to Sign Up- (616) 225-4653

Become a Member today and play the rest of the 2018 Season FREE!

As the 2018 season winds down, we are celebrating another great year at Glenkerry!  We want to invited you to join as a member now for the 2019 season with these great incentives! We love Glenkerry Golf Course and you will too!

Monthly & Annual Membership Payment Options Available!

PLAY GOLF NOW!

Join for the 2019 Season and play the rest of this season FREE!

TRY IT OUT!

Not sure about a year-long Membership? Try it out! Play the the rest of the 2018 season for just $149. If you like it, we’ll put that $149 toward your annual membership fees!

Glenkerry Cup
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Glenkerry Cup Final Event: Fall Big Hole!

2018 GLENKERRY CUP FALL BIG HOLE

Saturday, October 20, 2018

9 AM Check-In & Warm up  |  10 AM Shotgun

$55 Entry   |  $30 for Members

The event is a 4 person scramble and includes six prize holes, chili bar, and skins $20 per team (optional). Please fill out the request form below or sign up in the pro shop.

Questions? Register? Call 616-225-4653 or register online!

Today’s Event is a Two Person Scramble with Stableford Scoring!

We started something new!

Each week this fall,  we’re going to have a different golf event every Tuesday! We’ll change it up and keep it fun!

This week’s event is…

TWO PERSON SCRAMBLE WITH STABLEFORD SCORING  

 

Stableford Scoring: Points are awarded for your score on each hole on either a net or scratch basis. One (1) point for a bogey, two (2) for a par,  three (3) for a birdie, four (4) for an eagle, and five (5) if you bag an albatross (fat chance!). Anything worse than a bogey, pick up and stop wasting everyone else’s time. We mean it in the nicest way possible!

Winning team and one random draw will win the pot!

TODAY Tuesday, September 25  |  Begins 4:30 PM

Costs

  • $10 entry fee per two person team – $4 goes to skins and $6 goes to prize holes!
  • Regular League Players Green Fee: $12
  • Non-Regular League Players Green Fee: $15

Call the Shop to Sign Up- (616) 225-4653

Comeback Complete: Tiger Woods Wins Tour Championship for 80th PGA Tour Victory

The comeback is complete: Tiger Woods is a winner once again.

Woods picked up his 80th career PGA Tour victory but first since 2013 on Sunday, shooting a one-over 71 to finish at 11 under and win the Tour Championship by two shots over Billy Horschel.

With the victory, Woods will finish second in the FedEx Cup standings behind world No. 1 Justin Rose, who birdied 18 to finish in a tie for fourth and win the $10 million Cup grand prize. Woods will receive $3 million for second place in the season-long points race.

The win puts an exclamation point on what has been a remarkable comeback from Woods, who had spinal fusion surgery last April and was arrested for DUI with five drugs in his system one month later. Roughly this time last year, Woods said at the Presidents Cup that he wasn’t sure if he’d ever compete on Tour again. Now he has picked up a win in the final event of the season and will move into the top 15 in the world rankings on Monday.

“I had a hard time not crying on the last hole,” Woods said after the round.

https://twitter.com/PGATOUR/status/1043983162336935936

“I just can’t believe I pulled this off,” he said while fighting back tears at the trophy ceremony. “It’s been tough. Not so easy the last couple years. I’ve worked my way back, and I couldn’t have done it without the help of everyone around me.”

Woods started the day with a three-shot lead over Rose and Rory McIlroy, the latter of whom fell out of contention while playing alongside Woods on Sunday. He birdied the first hole and pushed his lead to five on the front nine by finding fairways and greens and shooting a one-under 34 on the front nine.

After a birdie on 13, Woods had a five-shot lead with just five to play, but he would bogey 15 and 16, and his advantage shrunk to two. Woods got up-and-down for par on 17 to preserve the two-shot lead coming to the par-5 18th, and the win was virtually clinched when he smashed a drive right down the center at the finishing hole.

As he walked up the green after knocking his second into a greenside bunker, scores of fans followed right behind him in an iconic spectacle.

Woods then blasted out to six feet and two-putted to seal his first win in 1,876 days. He paused for a moment after sinking the final putt before raising his arms in triumph.

Below is a hole-by-hole recap of the round, including highlights and analysis.

HOLE 18, PAR 5 – PAR, +1 FOR DAY, -11 FOR TOURNAMENT

Woods is a winner again! He split the fairway with his drive and let out a big smile after that. He would knock his second into a greenside bunker, blasted out to six feet and two-putted for the win.

HOLE 17, PAR 4 – PAR, +1 FOR DAY, -11 FOR TOURNAMENT

Absolutely massive par save. Tiger missed left with a 3-wood again and hacked a wedge over the green. He was fortunate to find some trampled-down rough and played a nice chip to about four feet. Dead-center with the par effort and he’ll head to 18 needing a bogey or better for the win.

HOLE 16, PAR 4 – BOGEY, +1 FOR DAY, -11 FOR TOURNAMENT

Well, this is getting more interesting than Woods would like. He tugged a 3-wood into thick rough and opted to hack it out with a wedge and try to make par the hard way. His third was on line but landed long and was fortunate to spin back out of the thick stuff onto the fringe. His par effort wouldn’t go and it’s his second straight bogey, and now the lead is down to two with two to play.

HOLE 15, PAR 3 – BOGEY, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

Really lucky not to find the water, as he missed short and right of the par 3. That could have been wet for the same price. He drew a good lie in the rough, however, and was able to play a bump-and-run to about nine feet. Couldn’t get the par putt to fall and the lead is down to three, as Billy Horschel has posted nine under.

HOLE 14, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

The 14th is the longest par 4 on the course at roughly 530 yards, so it’s absolutely imperative to hit the fairway if you’re going to make par. Woods did exactly that, peeling a cut that found the right side of the short grass. From there he hit a laser long iron to about 15 feet before the putt went begging by on the left side. Stress-free pars will suffice right now.

HOLE 13, PAR 4 – BIRDIE, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

A textbook birdie: driver down the center, wedge to 13 feet and a putt right in the middle of the cup. The lead is now back up to five—Billy Horschel is in second at eight under—and this tournament is very much his to lose.

HOLE 12, PAR 4 – PAR, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger found the fairway with a cut 3-wood and hit a nice wedge to about eight feet, but the birdie effort wasn’t his best. It was left to right and he didn’t give it enough pace, missing on the low side.

It’s a bit of a missed opportunity, but six more pars will mean win No. 80.

HOLE 11, PAR 3 – PAR, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

Just what he needed after the first bogey of the day. A really solid mid-iron into the middle of the par 3 green, which left a speedy putt down the hill. The birdie putt was left the whole way and rolled out to about three feet, but he brushed that in without incident. The lead is back to five after a Rose bogey.

HOLE 10, PAR 4 – BOGEY, E FOR DAY, -12 FOR TOURNAMENT

First bogey of the day comes after a wayward right drive forced Tiger to punch out with his second. The punch out rolled out a bit too far into the first cut and he didn’t judge the distance well on his third from 77 yards, hitting it 25 feet past the hole. Two putts from there and it’s his first dropped shot, and the lead is trimmed to four.

HOLE 9, PAR 3 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger hit a long-iron to the middle of the green on this 235-yard par 3. He liked that one and picked up the tee early. A nice effort from 35 feet rolls out to tap-in range, and that’s now eight straight pars after the opening birdie. His lead, which was three at the beginning of the day, is now 5. Nine more holes to go…

HOLE 8, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

There’s water all along the left side of 8, so it’s no surprise that Tiger bailed out right into a fairway bunker. He was able to get his second onto the front portion of the green and two putted from abouot 50 feet to keep the round bogey-free. Onward…

HOLE 7, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger continues to find fairways—he’s hit five of the first six—and hit an approach right at the flag, but it rolled out to about 20 feet past the hole. Another birdie effort that looked on line but finished about a foot short for another stress-free par.

Through seven holes, he’s been solid as can be: hitting fairways and greens and avoiding bogeys. Perfect gameplan when you have a big lead like this. It’s almost like he’s done this before…

HOLE 6, PAR 5 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Bit of a missed opportunity, especially after Tiger ripped one down the middle and had just 215 into the par 5. He pulled his second shot significantly, as he was aiming toward the center of the green but hit a smother hook long and a bit left of the flag. It nestled way down in rough and he basically chunked his third, leaving it on the fringe. He left his long birdie effort short and did well to hole a four-footer for par.

Pars aren’t going to hurt Tiger too much right now—his lead is still five—but he’d be the first to tell you that he’d expect himself to make birdie from where he was off the tee.

HOLE 5, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger spoke after yesterday’s round about how the rest of the field would have to come chase him, and that he could make it very difficult for them by keeping a clean card. He’s doing exactly that, finding yet another fairway and giving himself a good luck at birdie after hitting wedge to about 15 feet. The putt had a chance but missed just barely to the left, prompting a reaction of surprise. Another par with a par 5 coming up next.

HOLE 4, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Important par save after he missed the fairway to the right, drawing a gnarly lie in the Bermuda rough. He tried to muscle an iron from 170ish to the green but it came out dead, finding a bunker short and right of the green. It was about a 30-yard bunker shot and he splashed out to about 10 feet, then made his par effort after McIlroy missed a par putt of similar length. Really good save.

His lead remains four over Justin Rose, but he now holds a five-shot advantage over McIlroy.

HOLE 3, PAR 4 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Tiger went with iron off the tee to play for position and executed it perfectly, finding the center of the short grass. From about 125 he went with sand wedge, flying it right over a front pin to about 20 feet. The pin was tucked right over a bunker, and both Woods and McIlroy played conservatively past the pin. It left a huge left-to-right breaker for birdie—like, 10 feet of break—and it ran out of steam short of the hole. No issues with the par putt and it’s a one-under start after three holes.

HOLE 2, PAR 3 – PAR, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Iron to the center of the green on this 200-yard par 4, leaving about 40 feet for birdie. The putt was on line but finished a few rolls short, leaving a stress-free tap-in for par.

HOLE 1, PAR 4 – BIRDIE, -1 FOR DAY, -13 FOR TOURNAMENT

Ideal start. Tiger went with driver off the tee and picked up the tee really quickly as it was right down the center. His approach was right at the flag and finished just 10 feet from the hole. He walked in the birdie effort. Couple the birdie with McIlroy’s par and Tiger’s lead is now four.

Couldn’t have asked for a better start.

PGA Tour makes big changes to playoffs, season-ending Tour Championship

ATLANTA — The biggest payday in golf is getting bigger.

The PGA Tour and FedEx announced major changes Tuesday to the season-long race to the FedExCup starting next season, including the grand prize for the champion being bumped to $15 million from $10 million.

The playoffs also will be reduced from four events to three, and the postseason finale at The Tour Championship at East Lake Golf Club will have a simplified scoring system to determine the overall champion.

Further, there will be a new Wyndham Rewards Top 10 race doling out $10 million to the best players during the regular season, with the leader in the standings heading into the playoffs getting $2 million and the 10th-place finisher getting $500,000.

In addition to the Wyndham Rewards, the FedExCup bonus pool will increase by $25 million to $60 million.

“We’re thrilled with these changes put forth today. In fact, it’s been a long time coming, and we’ve really looked forward to this day,” PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan said Tuesday during his state of the union address at East Lake Golf Club. “But you take these changes and you combine them with the new and improved schedule, and we think this is a significant step forward for the PGA Tour.”

The adjustments coincide with the Tour’s significant changes to the schedule, which now will see the season conclude before Labor Day to escape the looming shadows of the NFL, MLB and college football.

The schedule adjustments include the playoffs being reduced to three events – the Northern Trust, BMW Championship and The Tour Championship. The first playoff event at the Northern Trust will feature 125 players with a cut down to the top 70 for the BMW Championship. Both events will award quadruple points compared to regular-season events.

As has been the case since the FedExCup Playoffs’ inception in 2007, the postseason’s last event, The Tour Championship, will feature 30 players. But starting next year, points will not be reset. Instead, the FedExCup points leader after the first two playoff events will begin The Tour Championship at 10-under par. The next four players in the standings will start at 8 under through 5 under, respectively. The next five will begin at 4 under, regressing by one stroke per five players until those ranked Nos. 26-30 start at even par.

There will no longer be a need for high-tech calculators as head-scratching scenarios explaining what a player would have to do to win the FedExCup are eliminated. Instead, the player with the lowest score at the end of the week will win The Tour Championship, the FedExCup and $15 million.

Monahan, who said the Tour considered many format changes, said he loves the beauty of the simplicity of the scoring at the playoff final.

“Win The Tour Championship and you are the FedExCup Cup champion. It’s that simple,” Monahan said. “And we have no doubt it will create a compelling, dramatic conclusion for the Tour’s ultimate prize.”

But it will be weird, said defending FedExCup champion Justin Thomas. He said the strokes-based system will take some getting used to, especially if you start 8 to 10 shots back and shoot over par and you’re basically eliminated after the first round. Or you could have the best 72-hole score and not win the tournament.

“It’s never going to be perfect,” said Thomas, who last year won the FedExCup while Xander Schauffele won The Tour Championship. “No system in any sport is ever going to be perfect, and the Tour has done such a great job of talking to us and trying to get it as good as possible. For how much pride we take in our wins, I think that that’s something that’s going to be a little different.

“We’re just going to kind of see how it unfolds, and hopefully it turns out well. I liked the way that it is now, but like anything, you’re just going to have to get used to it and we’re just going to have to become comfortable with it because that’s the way it is. Hopefully, and I’m sure it will, it will produce a lot of great drama and a very deserving winner.”

, USA TODAY
Source: USA Today

Glenkerry Cup Par 3 Challenge this weekend!

2018 GLENKERRY CUP PAR 3 CHALLENGE

Saturday, September 22, 2018

10:00 AM Check-In & Warm up  |  11 AM Tee Off

$55 Entry   |  $30 for Members

Medal Play

The event includes special event holes, prize money for 1st place plus draw(s), hot dog at the turn, and skins games (optional).

Questions?  Call 616-225-4653.

Back-to-back for Bryson, Finau’s Ryder Cup case, more putter woes for Tiger and a brutal gimme putt: What you missed

NORTON, MA – SEPTEMBER 03: Bryson DeChambeau of the United States reacts on the 15th green during the final round of the Dell Technologies Championship at TPC Boston on September 3, 2018 in Norton, Massachusetts. 

Bryson goes back-to-back

This time in 2016, Bryson DeChambeau didn’t have his tour card. He’s now weeks away from cashing golf’s biggest paycheck.

Fresh off a resounding win at Ridgewood, the 24-year-old ran the performance back at TPC Boston, his final-round 67 good enough for a two-shot victory over Justin Rose to capture the Dell Technologies Championship.

“Consistency has been a big thing for me,” said DeChambeau, who will be No. 1 spot in the FedEx Cup standings heading into East Lake no matter what happens at the BMW Championship. “I’ve been trying to get that week in and week out, and I was able to kind of figure something out last week on the putting green and that’s kind of progressed me to move forward in the right way.”

DeChambeau began the weekend seven shots back of the leaders, but made his charge on Sunday, an eight-under 63 earning him a spot in the final pairing with Abraham Ancer. Bryson put an early end to the afternoon with five birdies on the front nine, his steady ball-striking (sixth in sg/tee-to-green) and short game (sixth in putting) keep contenders at bay.

DeChambeau is only the second player to win the first two legs of the FedEx Cup (Vijay Singh accomplished the feat in 2008). The win also comes near the two-year anniversary of DeChambeau, in the Web.com Finals after struggling in his first summer on tour, grabbing the DAP Championship to earn promotion to the bigs. Moving to No. 7 in the world—a ranking better than Rory McIlroy, Jordan Spieth, Rickie Fowler, Jason Day and Patrick Reed—and a Ryder Cup bid looming, don’t think you’re going to see DeChambeau back in the minors anytime soon.

Speaking of Ryder Cup…

Finau making life easy on Furyk

The most important responsibility of a Ryder Cup captain is choosing his at-large selections. And also the most scrutinized. Case in point: Darren Clarke picking Lee Westwood and Martin Kaymer due to their experience rather than their play in 2016. A move that backfired, with the two going 1-6 in seven matches at Hazeltine.

Which brings us to Jim Furyk, manning the helm of the American squad this fall. Furyk technically has four picks at his disposal, although—thanks to strong seasons, their roles in the team’s brain trust, and frankly, their importance in promotion and marketing—many believe Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson are already on the team. That leaves two spots, one of which DeChambeau has essentially locked up. And if DeChambeau’s work the past two weeks have earned him the nod, the same could be said about Tony Finau.

A week after finishing runner-up to DeChambeau at the Northern Trust, Finau turned in another fine display, finishing T-4 at TPC Boston. Following Sunday’s round, Finau was not shy about this Paris ambitions.

“The more solid I play each week, I’m making it tough to not pick me, if I’m being honest,” Finau said. “I’m not the one that gets to pick, I’m the one that just gets to play. But I’ve played some nice golf these last couple weeks, and if that’s what it comes down to when (Furyk) makes his decision to pick a team for the Ryder Cup, and that’s what he’s waiting for for those picks, then I think I’m going to be a hard guy to look past.”

Finau makes a compelling argument. Finau is crazy long (third in distance), racks up the red numbers (sixth in eagles, 11th in birdies), is tough as nails (remember that 68 at Augusta National after dislocating his ankle?), and only Dustin Johnson has more top-10 finishes this year. That three of those came at majors doesn’t hurt his cause.

The only real knock on Finau is his lack of wins—his only career victory came at the 2016 Puerto Rico Open—but it’s one he’s not giving much thought.

“I’m trying to win every time I play,” Finau said. “I haven’t been able to do it, but I just feel the more I give myself opportunities, it’s going to happen. And my game feels as good as ever.”

Furyk will announce three of his picks on Tuesday, with the final selection coming after the BMW Championship. Theoretically, Furyk could announce Finau next week. But the 28-year-old doesn’t need another tournament to make his case.

Short-game slump continues for Tiger

At one point, he was three shots off the lead on Monday. That was the good news for Tiger Woods. The bad is the 14-time major winner remains flummoxed on the greens.

Woods went to his third flat stick of the year in Boston, desperately seeking answers for a short game that ranked last in New Jersey. Though his putting showed signs of life earlier in the week, it failed him again as the tournament progressed, posting negative strokes gained totals on Sunday and Monday and needing 33 strokes on the greens in the final round. Trouble that transformed a possible top-five standing into a T-24 finish.

To be fair, it wasn’t just the putter that was off on Monday, as Woods’ usually-stout second-shot game failed to fire on all cylinders. His driving didn’t do him any favors, either.

Still, if Tiger hopes to make it to the Tour Championship—and perhaps more importantly, be formidable in France—he needs to right the ship with the short game, and in a hurry. That this week’s BMW Championship is at Aronimink Golf Club, one of the harder venues in the country, won’t help.

A brutal missed gimme

Of course, Woods’ putting woes are nothing compared to this.

“This” being Joe Durant at the 17th hole of the PGA Tour Champions’ Shaw Charity Classic. Durant was tied with Scott McCarron, looking at a birdie attempt to take the lead into the final hole. Alas, Durant’s attempt failed to find the cup.

And so did his par putt from gimme length.

Ahead, McCarron birdied the final hole, and though Durant also made bird, the gimme ultimately cost him a shot at a playoff.

Personally, I blame the yellow ball.

Mahan regains tour card

Hunter Mahan has lost his way inside the ropes the last few seasons. The former World No. 4 fell to a low as 859th after last year’s U.S. Open and, following a failed attempt at the Web.com Tour Finals, lost his tour card for the first time in his career. He’ll start his revival bid in earnest next season, with full exemption in tow.

Mahan, who made appearances on the tour this year thanks to past champion status, accumulated enough non-member points to earn a return to this year’s Web Finals. The six-time tour winner made an auspicious showing at the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Championship, the circuit’s first postseason event, but it was his performance at the DAP Championship that is sending him back to the big leagues. Mahan bounced back from a so-so 71 start to turn in a 66, 65 and 67, rounds good enough to vault him to a runner-up finish at Canterbury Golf Club. The T-2 bestowed $88,000, a sum that guarantees Mahan will receive one of the 25 cards dispersed through the tour’s Finals.

Mahan, who’s made seven Ryder and Presidents Cups appearances for the United States and $30 million in his career, has just one top-10 finish on the PGA Tour since 2015. Mahan asserted that fighting his swing back happened to coincide with starting a family, and admitted he was unable to adjust according on the course.

“We have a lot going on,” Mahan said. “Mentally, you’d like to deal with one thing at a time. I think it overwhelmed me and I lost track of my swing a little bit. It feels like an avalanche, but it’s just a snow flurry.

“I’m a father and a husband, and I have to be there first. It’s hard to be there mentally in both places.”

This past year, Mahan’s family also dealt with the loss of his sister-in-law Katie Enloe, wife to SMU coach Jason Enloe, to leukemia.

However, Mahan had showed signs of life prior to the Web Finals, nearly winning the alternate event Barbasol Championship in July. With his tour card in hand, Mahan likely won’t return to the world’s top five. But he’s only 36 years old, and proved this week he still has plenty of gas left in the tank.

Source: golfdigest.com

This article is from Dew Sweeper, your one-stop shop to catch up on the weekend action from the golf world.