I could talk for weeks about my 50-year infatuation with all things putting. But I figured I’d just give you the CliffsNotes instead.

1. Putting is important.

Regardless of skill level, putting accounts for approximately 43 percent of your total strokes, taking into account your good putting days and the ones where you’re ready to snap your flatstick over your knee. Lower this percentage and your scores will go down. Allocate at least one-third of your practice time to becoming the best putter you can be.

2. Aim is critical.

You can’t dominate with your putter if you don’t know how to aim it correctly, or how much break to play. Nail these fundamentals first.

3. Keep your stroke “on-line” through the impact zone.

If you hook or cut-spin your putts, your chance of success goes down. If your putts roll off the face in the same direction your putter is heading immediately after impact, that’s good. If your putter moves one way and the ball another, you’ve got problems.

4. Face angle is even more important than stroke path.And not insignificantly — it’s six times more important. Even if your path is good, unduly opening or closing the face at impact spells doom.

5. You’re only as skilled as your impact pattern.

Catching putts across the face produces varying ball speeds. Find one impact point. My recommendation: the sweet spot.

6. Putts left short never go in.

When you miss, your putts should end up 17 inches past the hole. If you roll them faster, you’ll suffer more lip-outs. Roll them slower and the ball will be knocked off line by imperfections (footprints, pitch marks, etc.) in the green.

7. Proper putt speed comes from proper rhythm.

At our schools, we incorporate rhythm into pre-putt rituals, then carry that same rhythm through the stroke. Rhythm is the harbinger of consistency. You’ve got to find your own, and groove it.

8. Putting is a learned skill.

Having the “touch” in your mind’s eye to know how firmly to stroke a putt (so its speed matches the break), and then also having the “feel” in your body to execute that touch is gained only through experience and solid practice. See No. 1.

9. Be patient.

Sometimes poorly-struck putts go in and well-struck putts miss. Sometimes badly-read greens compensate for poorly struck putts. Results can confuse golfers when they don’t understand the true fundamentals of putting. Having the patience to learn to be a good putter is an incredible virtue for a golfer.

10. Putting is like life.

You don’t have to be perfect, but you can’t do any of the important things badly. My advice? Believe in yourself. Becoming a great putter isn’t easy, but it’s possible (Phil Mickelson, at age 48, is enjoying the finest putting season in his career). Maintain a good, hardworking attitude as you work through items 1 through 9. I’ve seen success stories happen thousands of times. Everyone is capable of improving.

Source: golf.com

Wishing you and your family a happy and safe Independence Day

_______

Don’t Forget about $25 ALL DAY

Play as much golf as you want tomorrow, July 4th for just $25! Can’t beat a day on the golf course!

Phil Mickelson made an appearance in Chicago on Monday at a charity event in conjunction with the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship. Though the gathering was to focus on the tournament that begins Thursday at Kemper Lakes Golf Club, all focus remained on Mickelson and his curious decision to swat a moving ball at the U.S. Open.

Speaking to media, the 48-year-old continued to express regret for his actions that resonated well outside the Shinnecock confines.

“It took me a few days to kind of let my anger and frustration of the whole thing subside to where I could see clearer that it wasn’t the greatest moment,” Mickelson told reporters. “And since I apologized, the best thing I can do now is help promote the game in a positive way, which is why I’m here today.”

Mickelson, who is sponsored by KPMG, hosted a clinic for kids at Monday’s event while also tossing football with Bears quarterback Chase Daniel and shooting free throws with Bulls guard Kris Dunn and Sky guard Diamond DeShields. Mickelson later made an appearance with Golf Channel’s Todd Lewis, where he again apologized for the commotion.

“It wasn’t the right decision,” Mickelson told the Golf Channel. “It wasn’t the smart decision.”

When asked if he expected his legacy to take a hit, Mickelson acknowledged he hadn’t considered the ramifications, but sounded ready for the blowback.

“I certainly wasn’t thinking of that at the time, but I have pretty thick skin,” Mickelson said. “I will probably hear about this for some time.

“Fortunately, I can take it and hopefully at some point we will be able to laugh about it.”

Source: Golf Digest

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All majors are noteworthy, but it sure feels like this year’s are especially monumental. Part of that is surely due to the return of Tiger Woods (more on this shortly) and the level at which golf is being played across the board right now. The top 20 in the Official World Golf Rankings is an embarrassment of riches that includes, by my count, 13 golfers who are either already locks for the hall of fame or on the trajectory towards it. That’s insane.

It also leads to an abundance of storylines for the second major of the season. U.S. Opens are often known for their courses, but the prevailing theory this time around is that the course (which you can read about here) is going to play a secondary role to the players. Hopefully that’s the case after three straight years of consternation. Here are nine storylines to keep an eye on ahead of this year’s U.S. Open at Shinnecock.

1. Lefty’s slam: The first two storylines are also the most obvious. Here’s my take on Phil Mickelson: I think he has two more real chances to touch off the Grand Slam. He turns 48 on Saturday and will be 49 next year at Pebble Beach. After that, it’s Winged Foot, Torrey Pines, The Country Club and Los Angeles Country Club. Could Mickelson win a U.S. Open on one of those courses at age 50 or beyond? Sure, he could, but I think his last best chances are this year and next. That’s not exactly a hot take, but it’s worth noting, especially given the fact that his last two appearances at Shinnecock have both been top-five finishes.

2. Tiger’s last decade: This is my sixth year covering golf but just my third U.S. Open with Tiger Woods playing. He has been in the field just three times since 2010 and doesn’t have a top 20 finish. Still, he’s been splendid so far in his most recent comeback. He’s top 10 in strokes gained tee to green (within the range of players I expect to win this event) and obviously knows how to win U.S. Opens, which he last did 10 years ago. How much money could you have won by betting against Woods winning a major in the 10 years following that splendid one at Torrey Pines? For Tiger to get his first victory in five years at this place, in this tournament, might be too much to ask. Even for him.

3. Fowler’s first? I wanted to pick Rickie Fowler this week. I really did. I picked him for the Masters, and he almost made good on it. I couldn’t pull the trigger because Dustin Johnson might be playing chess to Fowler’s (and everyone else’s) checkers, but his quest as one of the handful of big time players without a major is fascinating.

The good news for Fowler is that this is a course that rewards patience and level-headedness, and maybe nobody on the PGA Tour is more patient and level-headed (at this talent level). He lacked the giddy-up he needed last year at Erin Hills after a crazy good first round. If he repeats those first round heroics in 2018, he can defend his way to major No. 1, and what a place to get it. Also, he has the best average finish (5.7) of any golfer over the last five U.S. Opens with at least three cuts made.

4. Spieth’s (so-called) struggles: Everything is relative, especially when you get into the range of top five players in the world. Jordan Spieth is No. 4 on the PGA Tour in strokes gained from tee to green. This is good. It’s in the class of players who could win this golf tournament. But he’s also not finished in the top 20 in any of his five events since the Masters and currently ranks No. 190 (!) in strokes gained putting. Cause for concern? Maybe, maybe not. But it’s certainly a massive talking point heading into the second major of the year. On the flip side, there’s this.

5. J.T. was the quietest No. 1: Justin Thomas was poised to enter this event as the seventh No. 1-ranked player in the world in the last seven years. Then Johnson torched the FedEx St. Jude Classic field for win No. 18 and took it back from him. Still, it feels like Thomas is flying in a little bit under the radar. I don’t know if he’s going to win this week, but it would definitely concern me if I’m in this field that one of the top two players in the world (who has somehow followed his elite 2017 year with one that’s nearly as impressive — if not more so — in 2018) isn’t really being talked about.

6. D.J.’s crown jewels: The No. 1 player in the world (again) is coming off a masterpiece at TPC Southwind in Memphis. Aside: You have to hole out your final shot of the tournament for a six-stroke win over Andrew Putnam to be considered a masterpiece. Now, he has a chance to win two U.S. Opens in three years and add Shinnecock to his embarrassing array of conquered courses: Riviera, Pebble Beach, Oakmont, Cog Hill, Doral, Crooked Stick.

Shinnecock’s variety is unparalleled in the United States. It requires every club and shot in a professional’s arsenal. Shinnecock is a course that won’t favor a particular style of play. It has enough width to allow the shorter player to use accuracy while not taking the driver out of the long player’s hands. The green complexes’ rolled-over edges and short grass surrounds create a razor thin margin of error.

The undulating fairways will produce a bevy of uneven lies that, coupled with ever-changing wind directions, will make it excruciating to control distances. A shot one yard from perfect can mercilessly tumble 30 yards away. The severe nature of the slopes of the greens will test a player’s touch and also command respect and thoughtful approach play. Shinnecock Hills will expose any and all flaws in a player’s game. It’s the finest major championship venue in the game because it asks the widest variety of questions to players. Shinnecock Hills will crown the week’s most well-rounded and skilled golfer.

7. Reed’s follow-up: Hey guys, remember me? The aftermath of Patrick Reed’s Masters win was about as quiet as it could have been given Reed’s age (27), nationality (American) and what could lay ahead of him (more majors). He flirted with contention last year at Erin Hills, and he could certainly do so again this year at Shinnecock. Can you imagine Reed holding a press conference at Carnoustie in a month with a pair of majors under his American flag-themed belt?

8. Ryder Cup implications: Such is the setup for Ryder Cup points that an American golfer can rise from deep in the rankings, win a major and catapult himself onto the team. These events provide so many Ryder Cup points that it would be nearly impossible for somebody like Jimmy Walker (15th), Luke List (20th) or Billy Horschel (23rd) to not make the team following a U.S. Open win. Keep that in mind when you’re staring at a third-round leaderboard that looks like our 2017 third-round leaderboard.

screen-shot-2018-06-08-at-10-23-02-am.png

9. Rory’s aggregation: Take any non-Tiger, non-Phil collection of three random golfers at the top of the world rankings, and it’s a pretty decent bet that Rory McIlroy has more majors than those three golfers combined. For example: Bubba Watson, Rickie Fowler and Jason Day (average world ranking: 12, combined majors: three). Or, say Justin Thomas, Dustin Johnson and Hideki Matsuyama (average world ranking: 4.3, combined majors: two). It’s really startling to think about the fact that, despite all the criticism he’s received and opining about gym work and putter woes, McIlroy still has four of these things. If he can add another U.S. Open, especially at a place like Shinnecock, especially before the age of 30, his status as an all-time legend will only grow.

Source: CBS Sports

Brooks Koepka gave Justin Rose his best shot on Sunday at Colonial, posting a seven-under 63 in the swelter Texas sun. And it still wasn’t nearly enough. Nothing was stopping the Englishman at the Fort Worth Invitational, as he shot rounds of 66-64-66-64 to finish three strokes clear of Koepka and making him the fifth multiple-winner on the PGA Tour this season.

“I’m delighted with the way I played this week,” Rose said. “Obviously the way I hit the ball this week I can be proud of the way—I’m a little bit speechless to be honest with you. Fooch [Rose’s caddie Mark Fulcher] and I had a great week out there. What a hard week, Fooch just kept me hydrated, fed, watered. Some of the challenge this week was just getting around this golf course.

“I haven’t played this venue in awhile, [so] to win on a golf course like Colonial, I couldn’t be more proud. It’s such a special golf course, I’ve loved playing here this week.”

Rose, who hadn’t made an appearance at Colonial since 2010, will be back for good now, and may have a few more wins in Fort Worth in his future if he plays as well as he did this week. He ranked first in the field in greens in regulation, strokes gained/total, strokes gained/tee-to-green and strokes gained approach-the-green. The impressive performance earned him his ninth career victory on tour, and it indicates he could be peaking at just the right time as he looks to win a second U.S. Open in a few weeks at Shinnecock Hills.

“I’d love to be more comfortable on the greens, wouldn’t we all,” Rose said. “But I feel like I’ve still got upside. When I look at my game I still feel like, this week was a big step in the right direction. Taking the range game to the golf course, there’s always a bit of a lag effect. You see your progress on the range long before you see it on the golf course, and this week it came for me, but there’s still more work to be done.”

Koepka, who will be defending his U.S. Open title at Shinnecock, looks to be rounding into form as well despite just returning from a wrist injury. He’s steadily improved in all three of his last starts, tying for 42nd at the Wells Fargo, tying for 11th at the Players thanks to another final-round 63 and now this week’s solo second.

“Feel like I’m playing really well,” Koepka said. “You know, for some reason over the past two years I feel like we probably had more second-place finishes than anybody. That’s kind of disappointing. At the same time, I’m playing well. I’m looking forward to the next few weeks.”

Emiliano Grillo shot a six-under 64 to finish in solo third, giving him his best finish this season. Kevin Na came in one stroke behind in solo fourth, tying the course record with a nine-under 61.

Source: Golf Digest

Mother Nature is finally letting up!

Glenkerry will be open for play Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at 10 AM. Don’s miss out this weekend and book a tee time online now.

 

Put your tax return to good use this year! We have the perfect Golf League for you this season and easy online sign up. Check out the links below to view all the details.

Mens League – Thursday Night

Ladies League – Wednesday Night 

Mixed League – Friday Morning 

Mixed League – Tuesday Night

Nine, Wine, & Stein Ladies – Wednesday Morning

Glenkerry Golf Course will be at the West Michigan Golf Show this weekend.  We are looking forward to seeing old friends and making new ones.  We have two great golf show specials available.  Special #1  – $99 buys you 5 – 18 hole rounds with a cart good any day during the 2017 season.  Special #2 – $75 four your foursome to play 18 holes with a cart any day during the 2017 season.  You can buy them at the golf show our at our online store.  Here is a link to a coupon to save you $2 off admission to the golf show.  https://www.showspan.com/WMG/home/coupon-request/